Education Counselor Career Field

education counselorCareer Overview

Education counselors are also known as school and vocational counselors. They provide counseling services for students in groups and individually and help them with career, personal, social and academic decision and issues. School counselors work with students from elementary school aged children all the way through college. They work with both students and academic organizations to promote academic, career, personal, and social development of children. School counselors work with students to help them understand their abilities, interests, and talents and create academic and career goals based on this information. Education counselors spend time counseling students who have academic and social problems and other special needs.

Education Requirements

Master’s Degree in School Counseling or Similar Field

Many states require public school counselors to have a master’s degree and some require school counselors to have both teaching and counseling degrees. Many states also have continuing education requirements for counselors working in public schools. For counselors working in post-secondary academic institution, a master’s degree in school or vocational counseling is generally a requirement to get hired.

Coursework

Human growth and Development
Social and Cultural Diversity
Relationships
Group Work
Career Development
Counseling Techniques
Assessment
Research and Program Evaluation
Professional Ethics and Identity

Employment Trends

Job Availability as of May 2008 for: 275,800
Projected Employment in 2018 of: 314,400
Average Annual Salary for Education Counselors in U.S. in 2008: $51,050

Top Colleges

Liberty University
Walden University
Capella University
Agrosy University
Keiser University

Related Jobs

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Teachers—special education

Article Reference: Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

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